Gleanings: July 14, 2016

British armed police patrol London's Leicester Square in July 2005, following the suicide bombings on the London transport system. One person was fatally shot by police in England and Wales last year. Photo by Max Nash, https://www.flickr.com/photos/brizzlebornandbred/, used under a creative commons license.
  • One person was fatally shot by police in England and Wales last year.
  • Black doctor who treated Dallas officers: “I defend you, I will care for you — but I still fear you.” 
  • ECOT, Ohio’s largest online school,  fights the state over an attendance audit.

One person was fatally shot by police in England and Wales last year

In all of 2015, there was one fatal shooting by police, the first in three years, in England and Wales, according to a 2014/15 report by the Independent Police Complaints Commission.

According to a House of Commons briefing paper, “The relevant guidance for England and Wales on armed policing, published by the College of Policing, does not refer to shooting to kill but, rather, to a ‘critical shot’ to immediately incapacitate the person.”

In the U.S., there were 990 people fatally shot by police in 2015, according to the Washington Post. The paper compiles these statistics because a complete data set is not kept by any federal government agency.

Of course, gun ownership rates in the US are much higher than in the UK, so U.S. cops have more reason to fear that citizens might be armed. WaPo’s data indicate that attack with a deadly weapon was in progress at the time of 632 of the 990 fatal police shootings, although it is not clear who was under attack or what “attack in progress” really means.

Black doctor who treated Dallas officers: “I defend you, I will care for you — but I still fear you”

“Trauma surgeon Brian Williams was running Parkland Memorial Hospital’s emergency room the night seven officers arrived after a shooting rampage in downtown Dallas,” reports the Washington Post.

“I want the Dallas Police Department to see I support you. I defend you. I will care for you. That doesn’t mean I will not fear you,” Williams said. “That doesn’t mean that when you approach me, I will not have a visceral reaction and start worrying about my personal safety.”

ECOT, Ohio’s largest online school, fights the state over an attendance audit

Ohio wants to conduct an attendance audit of Electronic Classroom of Tomorrow (ECOT), the state’s largest online charter school with 15,000 students. The Plain Dealer reports that the school stands to lose tens of millions of dollars if the attendance counts cannot be verified.

ECOT fought the state in a Franklin County court, requesting a temporary restraining order to block the audit. The judge denied ECOT’s request, and the audit is proceeding.

Stephen Dyer’s 10th Period blog reports that ECOT received $108 million in state funding in the 2015-16 school year and $903 million since 2000-01.

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